What is Porcelain Cladding Made of?

Porcelain and porcelain cladding is made from heating a mixture of silica, clays, and feldspar. Most materials required to make porcelain are natural and can be found in nature.

Since the Chinese created hard-paste porcelain, the first type of porcelain, it has been a cherished art form and has grown increasingly popular. The combination of its low porosity (the heat resistance we see in glass), and clay qualities enable porcelain to be very heat-resistant and thus have become very popular for usage especially in cladding.

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What is Porcelain Cladding Made of?

Porcelain and porcelain cladding is made from heating a mixture of silica, clays, and feldspar. Most materials required to make porcelain are natural and can be found in nature.

Since the Chinese created hard-paste porcelain, the first type of porcelain, it has been a cherished art form and has grown increasingly popular. The combination of its low porosity (the heat resistance we see in glass), and clay qualities enable porcelain to be very heat-resistant and thus have become very popular for usage especially in cladding.

These are the many different materials and minerals that porcelain and porcelain cladding is made of:

Clay

Clay is an all-natural material resource found in soil containing crystalline silica and aluminium silicates. Clays from different locations can result in different compositions but that does not mean they should not have relatively close properties.

Generally, porcelain clay is typically either ball clay or china clay. They are made mostly from aluminium silicate or kaolinite (see later).

Without the presence of additional materials, clay will only vitrify at high temperatures which means your sculpted clay will not magically turn into a vase unless you fire it in a kiln! When your clay fires, it adds a refractory element to the finished product which makes them resistant to high heat. While other items crack or shatter, porcelain stays resistant to high heat, and this will keep its shape.

Feldspar

Feldspar is a rock-forming mineral which is often confused in its natural state for quartz. Feldspar is typically white or orange. It is made up of flint and aluminium silicate which acts as a flux (fusing material) in the porcelain mixture so it can bring down the temperature of the clay while the porcelain bonds together.

In ceramics, feldspar is used as a flux (fusing material) in the porcelain mixture process. Without feldspar, porcelain would not be as refractory (heat resistant).

Silica

Silicon dioxide (silicon and oxygen) is a chemical commonly found in nature that facilitates the firing and forming of your porcelain. Silica is found in many parts of nature and is the top used filler for firing porcelain. Silica functions both in clay and glazes to fuse materials of the clay body together.

Silica exists in impure states like quartz, opal, and sand. While silica works to improve your porcelain’s final appearance, the exact type of silica used in your clay can determine what type of porcelain you will make.

China stone

An iron-free granite that is rich will feldspar. This porcelain is used in bone chine (see later) and is only somewhat kaolinized. Because it is often collocated with kaolin, this mineral has a composition that includes quartz, feldspar, and mica.

Kaolin

This white mineral is found in nature and often used in most modern ceramics. It is formed through weathering and bears the general formula Al2Si2O5(OH)4.
The natural white colour of Kaolin can often be stained yellow by the presence of hydrogen peroxide pigments which may require bleaching of kaolin before use in your porcelain.

Kaolin is also used for medical purposes, making paper, and much more.

Bone ash

Calcinated animal (cattle) bones that are used in manufacturing porcelain. Bone ash acts as a flux (fusing material) in the porcelain making process and is commonly used in making bone china which is the strongest porcelain.

Measuring it by weight, typical bone ash will consist of 56% calcium oxide and 42% phosphorus pentoxide. There are many other applications to bone ash too like agriculture, metallurgy, and machining.

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Where Can I Buy Porcelain Cladding And How Much Does It Cost?

The best place to buy porcelain cladding is right here at Dalply. We offer the best possible prices and can tailor any order to your exact specifications.

Fill out the form below with your details and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible to give you a free, no obligation quote. Or you can phone us right now on: 0131 564 0402.

Dalply 5 stars review
award winning cladding suppliers






Where Can I Buy Porcelain Cladding And How Much Does It Cost?

The best place to buy porcelain cladding is right here at Dalply. We offer the best possible prices and can tailor any order to your exact specifications.

Fill out the form below with your details and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible to give you a free, no obligation quote. Or you can phone us right now on: 0131 564 0402.

Dalply 5 stars review
award winning cladding suppliers